Pastor Terrance Taylor & Daughters Thank You …

February 5, 2016

For Steph Curry, Basketball is a Family Affair

Wardell Stephen “Steph” Curry II  is an American professional basketball player for the Golden State Warriors of the National BasketballRead more →

August 4, 2015

A Detective Adopts Two Brothers in Pittsburgh

With no-nonsense haircuts and near-unbreaking stoicism, Pittsburgh police Detective Jack Mook and his two adoptive sons looked like a familyRead more →

July 8, 2015

Fathers Pray

Fathers Pray, but what do they pray for and with whom?  In this clip we meet a father and sonRead more →

June 19, 2015

A Father Shows His Children the Humanity in Others

My name is Jermaine and I’m the father of two; my 12 year-old daughter and my 5 year-old son. MyRead more →

June 17, 2015

Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, HaroldRead more →

June 12, 2015

For One Father, Our Children, and Even Other Fathe …

My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl. Education is important to meRead more →

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Pastor Terrance Taylor & Daughters Thank You for Being a Friend.

A father and his daughters give musical thanks to his congregation. Check out this special rendition of Andrew Gold’ s “Thank You For Being a Friend”, the song popularized by the televisions show, The Golden Girls.

Check it out and share your thoughts.

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For Steph Curry, Basketball is a Family Affair

Stephen Curry Passes His Father, Dell, On the NBA's All-Time Made Three-Pointers List

Wardell Stephen “Steph” Curry II  is an American professional basketball player for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He is considered by some to be the greatest shooter in NBA history. Curry won the 2015 NBA Most Valuable Player (MVP) award and is a three-time NBA All-Star.

He’s also the son of former NBA player Dell Curry and older brother of current NBA player Seth. He played college basketball for Davidson. There, he was twice named Southern Conference Player of the Year and set the all-time scoring record for both Davidson and the Southern Conference. During his sophomore year, he also set the single-season NCAA record for three-pointers made.

Check out E:60’s profile as it reveals his story, and that of fatherhood and family.

 

 

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Sean “P.Diddy” Combs Reflects on His Father

Sean “P.Diddy” Combs reflects on his father, and the ways his father’s presence, death and absence have inspired him.

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A Detective Adopts Two Brothers in Pittsburgh

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With no-nonsense haircuts and near-unbreaking stoicism, Pittsburgh police Detective Jack Mook and his two adoptive sons looked like a family long before a judge made it official on Tuesday.

“You’re Mooks!” the detective told Josh, 15, and Jessee, 11, as they celebrated with high-fives outside the courtroom after the brief hearing before Judge Kathleen Mulligan.

“I have been so very impressed with the wonderful job (Mook) has done,” Mulligan said during the proceeding. Applause broke out when she signed the adoption order.

Mook met the boys about six years ago at Steel City Boxing, where he volunteers as a trainer.

In February 2013 , he stepped in as the boys’ foster father upon learning about their troubled home life with birth parents who struggled with drug addiction. Police had arrested the boys’ guardian.

They’ve been together since.

This summer, the boys fished at Pymatuning State Park and ate their way through Geneva on the Lake, Ohio. When Mook asked Jessee the name of the burrito place, Jessee grinned and said, “Effin Burrito.”

“They loved it,” Mook said.

Outside the hearing room, the boys — wearing collared shirts and dress pants — posed for photos with Mook and relatives. They changed into T-shirts and gym shorts as soon as they got to their Brighton Heights home, and they planned a pizza party at the gym that brought the family together.

“It’s real now. It’s forever,” Mook, 45, said. “Even when they leave the house at 18, I’ll still get headaches.”

Mook said the boys’ birth parents will remain part of their lives.

“I’m still ‘Coach,’ ” Mook said. “Their biological dad is still their dad. I want them to be a part of the good things they experience.”

The boys said they wanted Mook to go through with the adoption. They said they feel healthier. Josh is training for a 10-mile run in November, and Mook said he had to cheer Jessee up with ice cream at the end of last school year because the fifth-grader was upset he got a B and C instead of straight As.

“I’m very happy,” Jessee said. “His house is clean, he has great rules, and I know he’s going to make me a better man in life.”

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Fathers Pray

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Fathers Pray, but what do they pray for and with whom?  In this clip we meet a father and son as they pray before the son goes to sleep. How important is prayer to you as a father or parent; and if and when you pray with and for your children, what are you thankful for? What do you ask for? And how has praying together impacted your children, and your relationship with them?

Clip courtesy of

L Wisdom

Father Non Fiction Radio Host U-Dubb Network Manager Rhythmic expression Ruthless Tactics MC Speed Weight Training Gym View “Death Row” Trailer Below

 

 

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A Father Shows His Children the Humanity in Others

Jermaine

My name is Jermaine and I’m the father of two; my 12 year-old daughter and my 5 year-old son. My marriage to their mother is important to me because I find parenting requires a certain balance and teamwork that’s not always gender specific. Each of us holds the ingredients to our children’s success.

As it relates to me, the events that followed the death of Freddie Gray and the efforts of the 300 Men March against violence provide a platform to look at both issues, but it’s the anti-violence part that really touches me because I grew up surrounded by violence in Baltimore. That violence never hit home until it claimed my two younger brothers, who were murdered three years apart in Baltimore City. We’re on the corner of Park Heights and Cold Spring which is even more symbolic, because it’s the neighborhood my brothers and I grew up in.

I don’t live in the city anymore, but when we visit my daughter, in particular, is curious about the difference between the suburbs and the city. Our trips to Baltimore allow me to explain the importance of the company they keep, and people they associate with. No matter where you live, it’s important to always treat people with respect and to not be neighborhood or socioeconomic-centric. Most of all our visits prevent them from being naïve about what’s happening in the world beyond our neighborhood. I never want my kids to think living outside of the City of Baltimore makes them better than others, or to lead them to imagine other people don’t exist.

When I look at the closure of libraries and recreational centers, I realize it increases the number of unattended and misdirected kids on the city’s streets.  So I plan on being part of the solution by engaging those youth impacted.  We could live in a house on the hill, with no neighbors for miles, but we can never lose site of what we can do for the kids who may go hungry at night and struggle every day in the cities we come from.

As a father I want my children to see themselves, value, and humanity in the lives others.

 

STREAM FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD

FROM FATHERLESS TO FATHERHOOD from The Kobie Chronicles. on Vimeo.

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Fatherhood on The Find A Way to Make A Way Show

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On the next episode of The “FIND A WAY to MAKE A WAY” Show, in honor of Fathers Day, Harold S. Reed, Jr. dedicates the show to discussing what it is to be a father. The lines will be open for fathers to call in and share their insights and advice and for everyone else to give their dads a special shout out as well! We’ll be there and so should YOU!!

Be sure to tune and/or log in http://www.bks1radio.com/

Chill in the Chat Room or CALL IN! (646) 233-1302

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For One Father, Our Children, and Even Other Fathers, Watch What We Do

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My name is Matt, and I am the father of three boys and a girl.

Education is important to me for my children because life is about maneuvering and navigating through paths that exist, as well as creating those that don’t. Those who educate themselves and gain education from others have the ability to successfully navigate the paths that exist and create ones that don’t. The more you learn and master, the more possibilities you open up for yourself.

School limits us to a miniscule amount of what there is to know. In order to be educated one really must explore, read and watch various media forms, as well as get insight from elders in our communities who have wisdom from their own life experiences to share.

Following the riots I intend to mostly continue on the path I’ve been on. I’ve been an avid supporter of community organizations doing work in Baltimore. I’ve also been pulling fathers and families together in various ways for over a decade. I do plan to work with a few good brothers on a non-profit organization that serves children whose fathers are not in their lives, and fathers who are not in their children’s lives, although I planned to do that before the riots.

Doing these things will ensure that I continually do what I can to give people in Baltimore –both youth and adults– opportunities and resources needed to overcome obstacles that they face in life, and that they have positive male figures to help guide them along the way.

The Fatherhood Collective is my organization. Others doing great work in Baltimore include Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle, Save A Dope Boy, Shelly’s Helping Hands, Dream Girls Mentoring and the 300 Men Movement, just to name a few. As it relates to Baltimore and other parts of the world, fathers can improve the trajectory of their children and society by being living examples. Be that which you want others to emulate. Our children, and even other fathers, watch what we do.

 

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